PALM SUNDAY PROPERS AND HOMILY – Fr. Pfeiffer

Palm Sunday

     PALM SUNDAY

Early in the morning of this day, Jesus sets out for Jerusalem, leaving Mary, his Mother, and the two sisters Martha and Mary Magdalene, and Lazarus, at Bethania. The Mother of Sorrows trembles at seeing her Son thus expose himself to danger, for his enemies are bent upon his destruction; but it is not Death, it is Triumph that Jesus is to receive to day in Jerusalem. The Messias, before being nailed to the Cross, is to be proclaimed King by the people of the great City; the little children are to make her streets echo with their Hosannas to the Son of David; and this in presence of the soldiers of Rome’s Emperor, and of the High Priests and Pharisees,  the first, standing under the banner of their Eagles; the second, dumb with rage. The Prophet Zachary had foretold this Triumph which the Son of Man was to receive a few days before his Passion, and which had been prepared for him from all eternity.

Rejoice greatly, 0 Daughter of Sion! Shout for joy, daughter of Jerusalem! Behold thy King will come to thee; the Just and the Saviour, He is poor, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt, the foal of an ass. Jesus, knowing that the hour was come for the fulfillment of this prophecy, singles out two from the rest of his Disciples, and bids them lead to him an ass and her colt, which they would find not far off. He had got to Bethphage, on Mount Olivet. The two Disciples lose no time in executing the order given them by their divine Master; and the ass and the colt are soon brought to the place where he stands.

The holy Fathers have explained to us the mystery of these two animals. The ass represents the Jewish people, which had been long under the yoke of the Law; the colt, upon which, as the Evangelist says, no man yet hath sat, is a figure of the Gentile world, which no one had ever yet brought into subjection. The future of these two people is to be decided in a few days hence: the Jews will be rejected, for having refused to acknowledge Jesus as the Messias; the Gentiles will take their place, be adopted as God’s people, and become docile and faithful

The Disciples spread their garments upon the colt; and our Savior, that the prophetic figure might be fulfilled, sat upon him, and advances towards Jerusalem. As soon as it was known that Jesus was near the City, the Holy Spirit worked in the hearts of those Jews, who had come, from all parts, to celebrate the Feast of the Passover. They go out to meet our Lord, holding palm branches in their hands, and loudly proclaiming him to be King. They that had accompanied Jesus from Bethania, join the enthusiastic crowd. Whilst some spread their garments on the way, others cut down boughs from the Palm- trees, and strewed them along the road. Hosanna is the triumphant cry, proclaiming to the whole city, that Jesus, the Son of David, has made his entrance as her King.

November 9 Feast of Archbasilica of Our Savior

STATION AT ST. JOHN LATERAN

(Indulgence of 25 years and 25 Quarantines)

The Station, at Rome, is in the Basilica of Saint John Lateran, the Mother and Mistress of all Churches. The Papal function, however, now takes place at Saint Peter’s; but the usual Indulgences are still granted to those who visit the Arch- Basilica. The Mass of this Sunday retains no vestige of the joy, which characterized the ceremony of the Palms. The Introit is taken from the 21st Psalm, in which the Royal Prophet expresses the anguish of soul suffered by Jesus on the Cross.

Semi-double / Privilege of the First Class /Violet

 MASS PROPERS –  Missa “Domine, ne longe”

The Introit is taken from the 21st Psalm, in which the Royal Prophet expresses the anguish of soul suffered by Jesus on the Cross.

INTROIT

Domine, ne longe fácias auxílium tuum a me, ad defensiónem meam, áspice: líbera me de ore leónis, et a córnibus unicórnium humilitátem meam.

Psalm 21:2  Deus, Deus meus, réspice in me: quare me dereliquísti? longe a salúte mea verba delictórum meórum.

Domine, ne longe fácias auxílium tuum a me, ad defensiónem meam, áspice: líbera me de ore leónis, et a córnibus unicórnium humilitátem meam.

O Lord, keep not Thy help far from me: look to my defense: deliver me from the lion’s mouth, and my lowness from the horns of the unicorns.

Ps. O God, my God, look upon me; why hast Thou forsaken me? Far from my salvation are the words of my sins.

O Lord, keep not Thy help far from me: look to my defense: deliver me from the lion’s mouth, and my lowness from the horns of the unicorns.

In the Collect, the Church prays that we may have grace to imitate the patience and humility of our Saviour. Jesus suffers and humbles himself for us; it is but just that we should work out our salvation by following his example, that we should suffer, and be humble.

COLLECT

O Almighty and Eternal God, who wouldst have our Saviour become man, and suffer on a cross, to give man kind an example of humility; mercifully grant, that we may improve by the example of his patience, and partake of his resurrection. Through the same our Lord.

  In obedience to the wishes of the Church, we have knelt down at those words of the Apostle, where he says, that every knee should bow at the Holy Name of Jesus. If there be one time of the Year rather than another, when the Son of God has a right to our fervent adorations, it is this Week, when we see him insulted in his Passion. Not only should his Sufferings excite us to tender compassion; we should, also, keenly resent the insults that are heaped upon this Jesus of ours, this God of infinite Majesty. Let us strive, by our humble homage, to make him amends for the indignities he suffered in atonement for our pride. Let us unite with the holy Angels, who, witnessing what he has gone through out of love for man, prostrate themselves, in profoundest adoration, at the sight of his humiliations. 

Palm Sunday - at the Epistle - Passione-di-Cristo-Champaigne_eccehomo

EPISTLE

Lesson of the Epistle from Saint Paul the Apostle to the Philippians

Brethren, let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus: who being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God; but emptied Himself, taking the form of a servant, being made in the likeness of men, and in habit found as a man. He humbled Himself, becoming obedient unto death, even to the death of the cross. For which cause God also hath exalted Him, and hath given Him a name which is above all names: (Here all genuflect) that in the name of Jesus every knee should bend, of those that are in heaven, on earth, and under the earth: and that every tongue should confess that the Lord Jesus Christ is in the glory of God the Father.

In the Gradual, the Church makes use of the words of the Royal Prophet, who foretells the future glories of the victim that dies on Calvary; but he also confesses, that the success permitted to the enemies of Jesus had well nigh shaken his confidence.

GRADUAL

Thou hast held me by my right hand; and by Thy will Thou hast conducted me, and with Thy glory Thou hast received me. V. How good is God to Isræl, to those of an upright heart! but my feet were almost moved, my steps had well-nigh slipped: because I was jealous of sinners, seeing the prosperity of sinners.

The Tract consists of several verses taken from the 22nd Psalm, the last words of which were spoken by our Redeemer on the Cross. So clear and explicit are the words of this Psalm, that it might almost be called a history, as well as a prophecy, of the Passion.

Deus Deus meus

 Psalm 21: 2-9, 18, 19, 22, 24, 32

Deus, Deus meus, réspice in me: quare me dereliquísti? Longe a salúte mea verba delictórum meórum. Deus meus, clamábo per diem, nec exáudies: in nocte, et non ad insipiéntiam mihi.  Tu autem in sancto hábitas, laus Israël. In te speravérunt patres nostri: speravérunt, et liberásti eos. Ad te clamavérunt, et salvi facti sunt: in te speravérunt, et non sunt confúsi. Ego autem sum vermis, et non homo: oppróbrium hóminum et abjéctio plebis. Omnes qui vidébant me, aspernabántur me: locúti sunt lábiis et movérunt caput. Sperávit in Dómino, erípiat eum: salvum fáciat eum, quóniam vult eum. Ipsi vero consideravérunt et conspexérunt me: divisérunt sibi vestiménta mea, et super vestem meam misérunt sortem. Líbera me de ore leónis: et a córnibus unicórnium humilitátem meam. Qui timétis Dóminum, laudáte eum: univérsum semen Jacob, magnificáte eum. Annuntiábitur Dómino generátio ventúra: et annuntiábunt cæli justítiam ejus. Pópulo, qui nascétur, quem fecit Dóminus.

O God my God, look upon me: why hast thou forsaken me? Far from my salvation are the words of my sins. O my God, I shall cry by day, and thou wilt not hear: and by night, and it shall not be reputed as folly in me. But thou dwellest in the holy place, the praise of Israel. In thee have our fathers hoped: they have hoped, and thou hast delivered them. They cried to thee, and they were saved: they trusted in thee, and were not confounded.  But I am a worm, and no man: the reproach of men, and the outcast of the people. All they that saw me have laughed me to scorn: they have spoken with the lips, and wagged the head. He hoped in the Lord, let him deliver him: let him save him, seeing he delighteth in him. But they have looked and stared upon me; they parted my garments amongst them; and upon my vesture they cast lots. Save me from the lion’s mouth; and my lowness from the horns of the unicorns. Ye that fear the Lord, praise him: all ye the seed of Jacob, glorify him. There shall be declared to the Lord a generation to come: and the heavens shall shew forth his justice to a people that shall be born, which the Lord hath made.

It is now time that we should hear the history of our Savior’s Passion: but, in order that we may show both heaven and earth that we are not scandalized, as were the Disciples, at the sight of his apparent weakness and the triumph of his enemies, we hold in our hands the Palms, wherewith we have been proclaiming him as our King. The Church reads, on four different days of this Week, the four Evangelists’ narration of the Passion. She begins with that of St. Matthew, who was the first to write the Gospel. To express the sorrow which fills the hearts of the Faithful, the Acolytes do not carry the lights, nor is the Book incensed. Omitting the customary salutation, the Deacon, who is to take the part of the Evangelist, at once begins the mournful history of our Lord’s Sufferings and Death.

Taking of Christ - by Caravaggio

Taking of Christ – by Caravaggio

THE PASSION AND GOSPEL

The Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ according to St. Matthew

At that time: Jesus spake unto his disciples, saying:  Ye know that after two days is the feast of the passover, and the Son of man is betrayed to be crucified.  Then assembled together the chief priests, and the scribes, and the elders of the people, unto the palace of the high priest, who was called Caiaphas, and consulted that they might take Jesus by subtilty, and kill him. But they said, Not on the feast day, lest there be an uproar among the people.  Now when Jesus was in Bethany, in the house of Simon the leper, there came unto him a woman having an alabaster box of very precious ointment, and poured it on his head, as he sat at meat.  But when his disciples saw it, they had indignation, saying, To what purpose is this waste?

St Mary Magdalene - DOLCI, Carlo

St Mary Magdalene – DOLCI, Carlo

For this ointment might have been sold for much, and given to the poor.  When Jesus understood it, he said unto them, Why trouble ye the woman? for she hath wrought a good work upon me.  For ye have the poor always with you; but me ye have not always. For in that she hath poured this ointment on my body, she did it for my burial.  Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached in the whole world, [there] shall also this, that this woman hath done, be told for a memorial of her.  Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?  And they covenanted with him for thirty pieces of silver.  And from that time he sought opportunity to betray him.  Now the first day of the feast of unleavened bread the disciples came to Jesus, saying unto him, Where wilt thou that we prepare for thee to eat the passover?  And he said, Go into the city to such a man, and say unto him, The Master saith, My time is at hand; I will keep the passover at thy house with my disciples.  And the disciples did as Jesus had appointed them; and they made ready the passover.  Now when the even was come, he sat down with the twelve.  And as they did eat, he said, Verily I say unto you, that one of you shall betray me.  And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?  And he answered and said, He that dippeth his hand with me in the dish, the same shall betray me.  The Son of man goeth as it is written of him: but woe unto that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! it had been good for that man if he had not been born.  Then Judas, which betrayed him, answered and said, Master, is it I?  He said unto him, Thou hast said.  And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat; this is my body.  And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it; for this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.  But I say unto you, I will not drink henceforth of this fruit of the vine, until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father’s kingdom.  And when they had sung an hymn, they went out into the mount of Olives.  Then saith Jesus unto them, All ye shall be offended because of me this night: for it is written, I will smite the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock shall be scattered abroad.  But after I am risen again, I will go before you into Galilee.  Peter answered and said unto him, Though all men shall be offended because of thee, yet will I never be offended.  Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, That this night, before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice.

The Denial of Saint Peter (Caravaggio), 1610

The Denial of Saint Peter (Caravaggio), 1610

Peter said unto him, Though I should die with thee, yet will I not deny thee. Likewise also said all the disciples.  Then cometh Jesus with them unto a place called Gethsemane, and saith unto the disciples, Sit ye here, while I go and pray yonder.  And he took with him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and began to be sorrowful and very heavy.  Then saith he unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death: tarry ye here, and watch with me.  And he went a little further, and fell on his face, and prayed, saying, O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me: nevertheless not as I will, but as thou wilt.  And he cometh unto the disciples, and findeth them asleep, and saith unto Peter, What, could ye not watch with me one hour?  Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation: the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.  He went away again the second time, and prayed, saying, O my Father, if this cup may not pass away from me, except I drink it, thy will be done.  And he came and found them asleep again: for their eyes were heavy.  And he left them, and went away again, and prayed the third time, saying the same words.  Then cometh he to his disciples, and saith unto them, Sleep on now, and take your rest: behold, the hour is at hand, and the Son of man is betrayed into the hands of sinners.  Rise, let us be going: behold, he is at hand that doth betray me.  And while he yet spake, lo, Judas, one of the twelve, came, and with him a great multitude with swords and staves, from the chief priests and elders of the people.  Now he that betrayed him gave them a sign, saying, Whomsoever I shall kiss, that same is he: hold him fast.  And forthwith he came to Jesus, and said, Hail, master; and kissed him.  And Jesus said unto him, Friend, wherefore art thou come?  Then came they, and laid hands on Jesus, and took him.  And, behold, one of them which were with Jesus stretched out his hand, and drew his sword, and struck a servant of the high priest’s, and smote off his ear.  Then said Jesus unto him, Put up again thy sword into his place: for all they that take the sword shall perish with the sword.  Thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to my Father, and he shall presently give me more than twelve legions of angels?  But how then shall the scriptures be fulfilled, that thus it must be?  In that same hour said Jesus to the multitudes, Are ye come out as against a thief with swords and staves for to take me?  I sat daily with you teaching in the temple, and ye laid no hold on me.  But all this was done, that the scriptures of the prophets might be fulfilled. Then all the disciples forsook him, and fled.  And they that had laid hold on Jesus led him away to Caiaphas the high priest, where the scribes and the elders were assembled.  But Peter followed him afar off unto the high priest’s palace, and went in, and sat with the servants, to see the end.  Now the chief priests, and elders, and all the council, sought false witness against Jesus, to put him to death; but found none:  yea, though many false witnesses came, yet found they none.  At the last came two false witnesses, and said, This fellow said, I am able to destroy the temple of God, and to build it in three days.  And the high priest arose, and said unto him, Answerest thou nothing?  what is it which these witness against thee?  But Jesus held his peace.  And the high priest answered and said unto him, I adjure thee by the living God, that thou tell us whether thou be the Christ, the Son of God.  Jesus saith unto him, Thou hast said: nevertheless I say unto you, Hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven.   Then the high priest rent his clothes, saying, He hath spoken blasphemy; what further need have we of witnesses?  behold, now ye have heard his blasphemy.  What think ye?  They answered and said, He is guilty of death.  Then did they spit in his face, and buffeted him; and others smote him with the palms of their hands,  Saying, Prophesy unto us, thou Christ, Who is he that smote thee?  Now Peter sat without in the palace: and a damsel came unto him, saying, Thou also wast with Jesus of Galilee.  But he denied before them all, saying, I know not what thou sayest.  And when he was gone out into the porch, another maid saw him, and said unto them that were there, This fellow was also with Jesus of Nazareth.  And again he denied with an oath, I do not know the man.  And after a while came unto him they that stood by, and said to Peter, Surely thou also art one of them; for thy speech bewrayeth thee.  Then began he to curse and to swear, saying, I know not the man.  And immediately the cock crew.  And Peter remembered the word of Jesus, which said unto him, Before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice.  And he went out, and wept bitterly.  When the morning was come, all the chief priests and elders of the people took counsel against Jesus to put him to death:  And when they had bound him, they led him away, and delivered him to Pontius Pilate the governor.  Then Judas, which had betrayed him, when he saw that he was condemned, repented himself, and brought again the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders, saying, I have sinned in that I have betrayed the innocent blood.  And they said, What is that to us?  see thou to that.  And he cast down the pieces of silver in the temple, and departed, and went and hanged himself.  And the chief priests took the silver pieces, and said, It is not lawful for to put them into the treasury, because it is the price of blood.  And they took counsel, and bought with them the potter’s field, to bury strangers in.  Wherefore that field was called, The field of blood, unto this day.  Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremy the prophet, saying, And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me.  And Jesus stood before the governor:  and the governor asked him, saying, Art thou the King of the Jews? And Jesus said unto him, Thou sayest.  And when he was accused of the chief priests and elders, he answered nothing.  Then said Pilate unto him, Hearest thou not how many things they witness against thee?  And he answered him to never a word; insomuch that the governor marvelled greatly.  Now at that feast the governor was wont to release unto the people a prisoner, whom they would.  And they had then a notable prisoner, called Barabbas.  Therefore when they were gathered together, Pilate said unto them, Whom will ye that I release unto you? Barabbas, or Jesus which is called Christ?  For he knew that for envy they had delivered him.  When he was set down on the judgment seat, his wife sent unto him, saying, Have thou nothing to do with that just man: for I have suffered many things this day in a dream because of him.  But the chief priests and elders persuaded the multitude that they should ask Barabbas, and destroy Jesus.  The governor answered and said unto them, Whether of the twain will ye that I release unto you? They said, Barabbas.  Pilate saith unto them, What shall I do then with Jesus which is called Christ? They all say unto him, Let him be crucified.  And the governor said, Why, what evil hath he done? But they cried out the more, saying, Let him be crucified.  When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, but that rather a tumult was made, he took water, and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person: see ye to it.  Then answered all the people, and said, His blood be on us, and on our children.  Then released he Barabbas unto them: and when he had scourged Jesus, he delivered him to be crucified.  Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the common hall, and gathered unto him the whole band of soldiers.  And they stripped him, and put on him a scarlet robe.  And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, King of the Jews! And they spit upon him, and took the reed, and smote him on the head.  And after that they had mocked him, they took the robe off from him, and put his own raiment on him, and led him away to crucify him.  And as they came out, they found a man of Cyrene, Simon by name: him they compelled to bear his cross.  And when they were come unto a place called Golgotha, that is to say, a place of a skull, they gave him vinegar to drink mingled with gall:  and when he had tasted thereof, he would not drink.  And they crucified him, and parted his garments, casting lots:  that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, They parted my garments among them, and upon my vesture did they cast lots.  And sitting down they watched him there; and set up over his head his accusation written, THIS IS JESUS THE KING OF THE JEWS.  Then were there two thieves crucified with him, one on the right hand, and another on the left.  And they that passed by reviled him, wagging their heads, and saying, Thou that destroyest the temple, and buildest it in three days, save thyself.  If thou be the Son of God, come down from the cross.

Christ Crucified with the Virgin, Saint John and Mary Magdalene - Van Dyck, Sir Anthony

Christ Crucified with the Virgin, Saint John and Mary Magdalene – Van Dyck, Sir Anthony

Likewise also the chief priests mocking him, with the scribes and elders, said, He saved others; himself he cannot save. If he be the King of Israel, let him now come down from the cross, and we will believe him.  He trusted in God; let him deliver him now, if he will have him: for he said, I am the Son of God.  The thieves also, which were crucified with him, cast the same in his teeth.  Now from the sixth hour there was darkness over all the land unto the ninth hour.  And about the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice, saying, Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani? that is to say, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?  Some of them that stood there, when they heard that, said, This man calleth for Elias.  And straightway one of them ran, and took a spunge, and filled it with vinegar, and put it on a reed, and gave him to drink.  The rest said, Let be, let us see whether Elias will come to save him.  Jesus, when he had cried again with a loud voice, yielded up the ghost.  (Here all genuflect, and pause for a time)  And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent; and the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints which slept arose, and came out of the graves after his resurrection, and went into the holy city, and appeared unto many.  Now when the centurion, and they that were with him, watching Jesus, saw the earthquake, and those things that were done, they feared greatly, saying, Truly this was the Son of God.  And many women were there beholding afar off, which followed Jesus from Galilee, ministering unto him:  Among which was Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James and Joseph, and the mother of Zebedee’s children.  When the even was come, there came a rich man of Arimathaea, named Joseph, who also himself was Jesus’ disciple:  He went to Pilate, and begged the body of Jesus.  Then Pilate commanded the body to be delivered.  And when Joseph had taken the body, he wrapped it in a clean linen cloth, and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn out in the rock:  and he rolled a great stone to the door of the sepulchre, and departed.  And there was Mary Magdalene, and the other Mary, sitting over against the sepulchre.

The Entombment of Christ, (1602–1603) - Caravaggio

The Entombment of Christ, (1602–1603) – Caravaggio

That the Mass of this Sunday may not be deprived of that essential rite, which we call the Gospel, the Deacon reserves a portion of his narrative; and going to the Altar, he asks the Priest to bless the Incense. Which done, the Deacon himself also having received the Priest’s blessing, goes to the place appointed for chanting the Gospel; but the Acolytes do not carry their Lights. After having thurified the book, he thus closes the history of the Passion.

And the next day, which followed the day of preparation, the chief priest and the Pharisees came together to Pilate, saying: Sir, we have remembered, that that seducer said, while he was yet alive : After three days I will rise again. Command therefore the sepulchre to be guarded until the third day: lest perhaps his disciples come and steal him away, and say to the people he is risen from the dead: and the last error shall be worse than the first. Pilate said to them: You have a guard; go, guard it as you know. And they departing, made the sepulchre sure, sealing the stone, and setting guards.

SERMON – Palm Sunday 2015 ~ Father Pfeiffer

Let us now go over in our minds the other events, which happened to our Divine Lord on this day of his solemn Entry into Jerusalem. St. Luke tells us, that it was on his approach to the City, that Jesus wept over it, and spoke these touching words : If thou also hadst known, and that in this thy day, the things that are to thy peace! But now they are hidden from thine eyes. For the days shall come upon thee, and thine enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and compass thee round, and straiten thee on every side, and beat thee flat to the ground, and thy children who are in thee; and they shall not leave in thee a stone upon a stone; because thou hast not known the time of thy visitation. A few days ago, we were reading in the holy Gospel, how Jesus wept over the tomb of Lazarus; to-day, he sheds tears over Jerusalem. ‘At Bethania, his weeping was caused by the sight of bodily death, the consequence and punishment of sin; but this death is not irremediable: Jesus is the resurrection and the life, and he that believeth in Him, shall live? Whereas, the state of the unfaithful Jerusalem is a figure of the death of the soul, and from this there is no resurrection, unless the soul, whilst time is given to her, return to the Author of life. Hence it is, that the tears shed by Jesus, over Jerusalem, are so bitter. Amidst the acclamations which greet his Entry into the City of David, his heart is sad; for he sees that many of her inhabitants will not profit of the time of her visitation. Let us console the Heart of our Jesus, and be to him a faithful Jerusalem. The sacred historian tells us, that Jesus, immediately upon his entrance into the City, went to the Temple, and cast out all them that sold and bought there. This was the second time that he had shown his authority in his Father’s House, and no one had dared to resist him. The Chief Priests and Pharisees found fault with him, and accused him to his face of causing confusion by his entry into the City ; but our Lord confounded them by the reply he made. It is thus, that in after ages, when it has pleased God to glorify his Son and the Church of his Son, the enemies of both have given vent to their rage; they protested against the triumph, but they could not stop it. But, when God, in the unsearchable ways of his wisdom, allowed persecution and trial to follow these periods of triumph, then did these bitter enemies redouble their efforts to induce the very people, that had cried Hosanna to the Son of David, to clamor for his being delivered up and crucified. They succeeded in fomenting persecution, but not in destroying the kingdom of Christ and his Church. The kingdom seemed, at times, to be interrupted in its progress; but the time for another triumph came. Thus will it be to the end; and then, after all these changes from glory to humiliation, and from humiliation to glory, the kingdom of Jesus and his Spouse will gain the last and eternal triumph over this world, which would not know the time of its visitation. We learn from St. Matthew, that our Saviour spent the remainder of this day at Bethania. His Blessed Mother and the house of Lazarus were comforted by his return.

There was not a single offer of hospitality made to him in Jerusalem, at least, there is no mention in the Gospel of any such being offered. We cannot help making the reflection, as we meditate upon this event of our Lord’s life:  an enthusiastic reception is given to him in the morning, he is proclaimed by the people as their King; but, when the evening of that day comes on, there is not one of all those thousands to offer him food or lodging. In the Carmelite Monasteries of St. Teresa’s Reform, there is a custom, which has been suggested by this thought, and is intended as a reparation for this ingratitude shown to our Redeemer. A table is placed in the middle of the Refectory; and after the Community have finished their dinner, the food, which was placed upon that table, is distributed among the poor, and Jesus is honored in them.

Ven. Dom Gueranger, O.S.B.  – The Liturgical Year

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