Pope urges Muslim leaders to condemn terrorism and say, ‘This is not Islam!!!’

Bergoglio: equating Islam with violence is wrong. Islam is a religion of peace!!

Bergoglio: equating Islam with violence is wrong. Islam is a religion of peace!!

POPE: ‘AUTHENTIC’ ISLAM OPPOSES VIOLENCE!!!! 

Describing the Qu’ran as a “prophetic book of peace,” Francis said “I firmly believe that one can’t say all Muslims are terrorists, just as all Christians aren’t fundamentalists, even though we have some.” Bergoglio is dead wrong!!

“They (Muslims) say: ‘No, we are not this, the Koran is a book of peace, it is a prophetic book of peace’.”  – Francis – Bergoglio

Pope Pius II – “Turn the anger of the Almighty against the godless Turks and Barbarians who despise Christ the Lord…..In the royal city of the east, they have slain the successor of Constantine and his people, desecrated the temples of the Lord, defiled the noble church of Justinian with their Mohometan abominations. Each success, will only be a stepping stone until he has mastered all the Western Monarchs, overthrow the Christian Faith, and imposed the law of his false prophet on the whole world”

What does the Religion of Peace Teach About Violence…

Question:

Does the Quran really contain dozens of verses promoting violence?

Answer:

The Quran contains at least 109 verses that call Muslims to war with nonbelievers for the sake of Islamic rule.  Some are quite graphic, with commands to chop off heads and fingers and kill infidels wherever they may be hiding.  Muslims who do not join the fight are called ‘hypocrites’ and warned that Allah will send them to Hell if they do not join the slaughter.

Unfortunately, there are very few verses of tolerance and peace to abrogate or even balance out the many that call for nonbelievers to be fought and subdued until they either accept humiliation, convert to Islam, or are killed.  Muhammad’s own martial legacy – and that of his companions – along with the remarkable stress on violence found in the Quran have produced a trail of blood and tears across world history.

dealing with muslims

The Quran:

Quran (2:191-193) – “And kill them wherever you find them, and turn them out from where they have turned you out. And Al-Fitnah [disbelief] is worse than killing…

but if they desist, then lo! Allah is forgiving and merciful.   And fight them until there is no more Fitnah [disbelief and worshipping of others along with Allah] and worship is for Allah alone.  But if they cease, let there be no transgression except against Az-Zalimun (the polytheists, and wrong-doers, etc.)”  (Translation is from the Noble Quran)  The historical context of this passage is not defensive warfare, since Muhammad and his Muslims had just relocated to Medina and were not under attack by their Meccan adversaries.  In fact, the verses urge offensive warfare, in that Muslims are to drive Meccans out of their own city (which they later did).  The use of the word “persecution” by some Muslim translators is thus disingenuous (the actual Muslim words for persecution – “idtihad” – and oppression – a variation of “z-l-m” – do not appear in the verse).  The actual Arabic comes from “fitna” which can mean disbelief, or the disorder that results from unbelief or temptation.  Taken as a whole, the context makes clear that violence is being authorized until “religion is for Allah” – ie. unbelievers desist in their unbelief.

Quran (2:244) – “Then fight in the cause of Allah, and know that Allah Heareth and knoweth all things.”

Quran (2:216) – “Fighting is prescribed for you, and ye dislike it. But it is possible that ye dislike a thing which is good for you, and that ye love a thing which is bad for you. But Allah knoweth, and ye know not.”  Not only does this verse establish that violence can be virtuous, but it also contradicts the myth that fighting is intended only in self-defense, since the audience was obviously not under attack at the time.  From the Hadith, we know that this verse was narrated at a time that Muhammad was actually trying to motivate his people into raiding merchant caravans for loot.

Quran (3:56) – “As to those who reject faith, I will punish them with terrible agony in this world and in the Hereafter, nor will they have anyone to help.”

Quran (3:151) – “Soon shall We cast terror into the hearts of the Unbelievers, for that they joined companions with Allah, for which He had sent no authority”.  This speaks directly of polytheists, yet it also includes Christians, since they believe in the Trinity (ie. what Muhammad incorrectly believed to be ‘joining companions to Allah’).

Quran (2:191-193) – “And kill them wherever you find them, and turn them out from where they have turned you out. And Al-Fitnah [disbelief] is worse than killing…

but if they desist, then lo! Allah is forgiving and merciful.   And fight them until there is no more Fitnah [disbelief and worshipping of others along with Allah] and worship is for Allah alone.  But if they cease, let there be no transgression except against Az-Zalimun (the polytheists, and wrong-doers, etc.)”  (Translation is from the Noble Quran)  The historical context of this passage is not defensive warfare, since Muhammad and his Muslims had just relocated to Medina and were not under attack by their Meccan adversaries.  In fact, the verses urge offensive warfare, in that Muslims are to drive Meccans out of their own city (which they later did).  The use of the word “persecution” by some Muslim translators is thus disingenuous (the actual Muslim words for persecution – “idtihad” – and oppression – a variation of “z-l-m” – do not appear in the verse).  The actual Arabic comes from “fitna” which can mean disbelief, or the disorder that results from unbelief or temptation.  Taken as a whole, the context makes clear that violence is being authorized until “religion is for Allah” – ie. unbelievers desist in their unbelief.

Quran (2:244) – “Then fight in the cause of Allah, and know that Allah Heareth and knoweth all things.”

Quran (2:216) – “Fighting is prescribed for you, and ye dislike it. But it is possible that ye dislike a thing which is good for you, and that ye love a thing which is bad for you. But Allah knoweth, and ye know not.”  Not only does this verse establish that violence can be virtuous, but it also contradicts the myth that fighting is intended only in self-defense, since the audience was obviously not under attack at the time.  From the Hadith, we know that this verse was narrated at a time that Muhammad was actually trying to motivate his people into raiding merchant caravans for loot.

Quran (3:56) – “As to those who reject faith, I will punish them with terrible agony in this world and in the Hereafter, nor will they have anyone to help.”

Quran (3:151) – “Soon shall We cast terror into the hearts of the Unbelievers, for that they joined companions with Allah, for which He had sent no authority”.  This speaks directly of polytheists, yet it also includes Christians, since they believe in the Trinity (ie. what Muhammad incorrectly believed to be ‘joining companions to Allah’).

ROME — Pope Francis Sunday called on Muslim leaders to be more forceful about condemning violence committed in the name of their faith, asking them to declare that “this is not Islam.”

The pontiff said he raised the point in a private meeting with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan two days ago.

“I told the president it would be beautiful if all Islamic leaders, [including] politicians, religious leaders, and academics, clearly spoke out” in this sense, he said.

Francis made the comments during a 45-minute press conference on his return flight to Rome after a three-day stop in Turkey.

Among other things, Francis met Erdogan and other Turkish leaders during the trip, as well as sharing two liturgies with Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople and issuing a joint declaration with the Orthodox leader.

Shortly before leaving on Sunday, the pope also met a group of about 100 young refugees in Turkey, mostly Iraqi and Syrian, to say he “shares their sufferings.”

  • Argued that the “substance” of a controversial interim report from a recent Synod of Bishops, calling for a greater opening to gays, remained intact in the meeting’s final document despite some “amendments”. Many critics saw the final report as a significant retreat from the earlier position.
  • Confirmed that he did pray in Istanbul’s Blue Mosque on Saturday, despite Vatican attempts to describe his gesture with a Muslim cleric as a “moment of silent adoration.” The pope said he prayed for Turkey, for peace, for the mufti, and for himself, adding, “I need it.”
  • Said he would go to Moscow immediately if the Russian Orthodox leader invited him, and stressed his willingness to find a form of exercising papal power more acceptable to the Orthodox.
  • Acknowledged that some conservatives on both the Catholic and Orthodox sides have doubts about gestures of ecumenical openness, saying “we have to be respectful” of conservatives and “never tire of talking to them, without insulting them” and “don’t expel them.”
  • Said he wanted to visit a refugee camp during his three-day trip to Turkey, and still would like to go to Iraq, but both have been ruled out in part for security reasons.

In the wake of his third visit to a majority Muslim nation, Francis said it’s time for a “global condemnation” of terrorism by a cross-section of Islamic leaders.

The pontiff said he believes “the majority of the Muslim population becomes angry” about terrorist acts committed in the name of Islam, he said, “and hearing it from the mouths of their leaders would help.”

Describing the Qu’ran as a “prophetic book of peace,” Francis said “I firmly believe that one can’t say all Muslims are terrorists, just as all Christians aren’t fundamentalists, even though we have some.”

Yet the pontiff also said he didn’t want to “use sweet words” to play down the threat Christians in parts of the Middle East face from Islamic radicals.

“They’re kicking Christians out of the Middle East,” he said, citing the example of Christians in the area around Mosul in Iraq who were forced by the Islamic State “to either pay a tax or leave everything behind.”

Continue reading at Crux

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